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Behind the Scenes

Last Call: AHE’s Pompeii Exhibition Review

pompeii1Last call for the British Museum’s outstanding exhibition: “Life and Death, Pompeii and Herculaneum,” running until September 29, 2013.

Exhibition review provided by AHE contributor, Mr. James Lloyd:

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Behind the Scenes

AHE Listed as an “Indispensable Resource” for Online Academic Research

OnlinePhDPrograms225x300We are excited to announce that the Ancient History Encyclopedia has been listed as one of 105 Indispensable Resources for Online Research by OnlinePhDProgram.org.

Academic research is at the heart of any masters or doctoral program of study. While in-depth research was once confined to reference libraries and organizations with access to copies of academic journals, much of the work of original research can now be done virtually. Major repositories of academic research — like JSTOR and LexisNexis — can be searched comprehensively online, and even Google has an easy-to-use scholarly search engine. Online libraries, journals, databases, and academic search engines are great resources for graduate students, as well as people at any level of education who are conducing research projects.

OnlinePhDProgram.org is dedicated to helping future doctoral candidates find the right program that meets their needs, desires, and goals. Their site offers helpful blog posts, articles, and a wealth of other information that can answer your questions about doctoral programs. We thank them for their inclusion of AHE in their list!

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Uncategorized

AHE Recommended by Tijdschrift Origine

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It gives us great pleasure to announce that the Ancient History Encyclopedia (AHE) was recently profiled and recommended by the prominent Dutch fine arts magazine, Tijdschrift Origine (Nummer 3 2012, Jaargang 21). Based in Haarlem, Tijdschrift Origine provides independent, expert analyses on the international art sector, covering antiques, design, art history, and the protection of cultural patrimony. We applaud and thank them for helping bring increased public attention to the fine and applied arts, worldwide.

Here is part of the review in Dutch:

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“On the internet is a new virtual encyclopedia for old (art) history: the Ancient History Encyclopedia. The English language site is fully independent and relies primarily on volunteers and voluntary contributions. Within the site are many articles as well as encyclopedic entries about classical antiquity. AHE also provides historical maps on their site. [The Ancient History Encyclopedia’s] search engine provides several specific searches by topic, time period, architecture, wars and battles. In preparing this [précis], ORIGINE counted 381 articles and more than 2,000 images. Of course, that number is rapidly growing. Furthermore, there are several bloggers and reviewers to read. The Ancient History Encyclopedia is partnered with the Kunstpedia Foundation.”

AHE and Tijdschrift Origine share a similar, fundamental aim: to stimulate interest in the past through quality publishing and the promotion of academic research. Moreover, both of our organizations are committed to the cultivation of an understanding of the “big picture” and the minute detail. AHE strives to provide the best ancient history information on the internet for free. We combine different media, subjects, and periods in interactive ways that will help the public appreciate the complexity and richness of the “ancient world.” Editorial review remains a key component in our process to ensure highest quality.

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Interviews

Meet the Tarascans: Fierce Foes of the Aztecs

TarascanincenseburnerwTlalocheaddressAt the time of the Spanish conquest of Mexico (1519-1521 CE), two empires dominated the political and cultural landscape of Mesoamerica: the Aztec Empire and the relatively unknown Tarascan State. The Tarascans were the archenemies of the Aztecs, carving an empire of their own in the contemporary Mexican states of Michoacán, Guanajuato, Guerrero, Querétaro, Colima, and Jalisco. At the center of the Tarascan State was the splendid capital city of Tzintzuntzan–“the place of the hummingbirds”–located alongside Lake Pátzcuaro. From this religious and administrative center, the Tarascan cazonci or “king” ruled a multiethnic empire of 72,500 square kilometers (45,000 square miles), matching the Aztecs in might and power.

In this exclusive interview, James Blake Wiener of the Ancient History Encyclopedia speaks to Dr. Claudia Espejel Carbajal — professor of History at El Colegio de Michoacán (COLMICH) — an expert on Tarascan ethnohistory and archaeology.

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Uncategorized

Support AHE through Reading!

ReadingIf you love reading AHE’s definitions, articles, and special features, you should know that you can order books on ancient history and support us directly!

Books on multiple subjects can be bought through AHE’s book section via Amazon (US/UK) or Book Depository (which offers free international delivery). With every book order, AHE receives a small commission of around 5%, helping us provide you with the best, free ancient history content on the web. Take a look at our book search and compare prices to get the best deal. We provide the listing and link to Amazon or Book Depository, where you finalize your purchase(s).

Thank you for your support and happy reading!

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Interviews

Drink of the Gods: Wine in the Ancient Near East and Mediterranean

AncientphoenicianportTyreA symbol of fertility, immortality, and divinity, wine was the favored drink of choice across the ancient Near East and Mediterranean. Wine is mentioned frequently in biblical scriptures, and was used for everyday purposes in cooking and medicine. In this exclusive interview, James Blake Wiener of the Ancient History Encyclopedia speaks to Mr. Joel Butler, co-author of Divine Vintage: Following the Wine Trail from Genesis to the Modern Age, about the religious, cultural, and social importance of wine across the centuries.